The importance of knowing & living your values

The importance of knowing & living your values

Perhaps you have been thinking long and hard about what you want in your life. Or maybe, you’re reflecting on how you want to contribute to something bigger than yourself. You could even be thinking about your relationships and the role you would like them to play in your life. The answers to these big questions in life are often a reflection of our values, or our deepest desires and attitudes about the world, other people, and ourselves.

Research shows that understanding our values, strengths, and the things that make our life meaningful are all valuable skills that can help us navigate challenges and support our mental fitness.

Knowing and Living Your Values

Understanding our values can help us live a life that is more meaningful and in alignment with what we desire and believe is right. According to Psychologist Russ Harris, it is important to understand that values are not the same as goals. A value is not something that you can just cross off or achieve. Instead, it is something that you continuously aim to live and move towards. As stated by Harris, “for example, if you want to be a loving, caring, supportive partner, that is a value – an ongoing process. If you stop being loving, caring and supportive, then you are no longer a loving, caring, supportive partner; you are no longer living by that value. In contrast, if you want to get married, that’s a goal – it can be ‘crossed off’ or achieved. Once you’re married, you’re married – even if you start treating your partner very badly.”   

Each person has their own set of values, and only you can determine what those values are. No one else can define this for you. When you are exploring your core values, it is not always easy to pin them down therefore, it will take time for you to identify.

Do you know your top 5 personal core values? What about your top 5 work values?

If you would like some resources to help you identify your values, feel free to use listen to the core values activity below from our Appli Work Fit Digital Wellbeing Platform.  The Appli Team have also created an evidence-based toolkit called “Living a Meaningful Life” which can help you discover your values and live with meaning and purpose during the COVID pandemic and beyond.

https://shop.appli.edu.au

References

Martela, F., & Steger, M. (2016). The three meanings of meaning in life: Distinguishing coherence, purpose, and significance. The Journal Of Positive Psychology, 11(5), 531-545. doi: 10.1080/17439760.2015.1137623

Robinson, P. L., Oades, L. G. & Caputi, P. (2014). Conceptualising and measuring mental fitness, Doctor of Philosophy thesis, Department of Psychology, University of Wollongong. https://ro.uow.edu.au/theses/4269

Robinson, P. L., Oades, L. G., & Caputi, P. (2015). Conceptualising and measuring mental fitness: A Delphi study. International Journal of Wellbeing, 5(1), 53-73.

Robinson, P. L. (2018). Practising Positive Education: A Guide to Improve Wellbeing Literacy in Schools (2nd ed.). Positive Psychology Institute: Sydney.

Ryff, C. (1989). Happiness is everything, or is it? Explorations on the meaning of psychological wellbeing. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57(6), 1069-1081.

Seligman, M. (2011). Flourish: A new understanding of happiness and wellbeing and how to achieve them. London, UK: Nicholas Brealey Publishing.

Seligman, M. E. P., Steen, T. A., Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2005). Positive Psychology progress: Empirical validation of interventions. American Psychologist, 60, 410-421.

Steger, M. F. (2009). Meaning in life. In S. J. Lopez & C. R. Snyder (Eds.), Oxford handbook of Positive Psychology (pp. 679-687). New York, NY, US: Oxford University Press.

Wong, P. T. P., & Wong, L. C. J. (2012). A meaning-centered approach to building youth resilience. In P. T. P. Wong (Ed.), The human quest for meaning: Theories, research, and applications (2nd ed., pp. 585-617). New York, NY: Routledge.

Wong, P. (2011, July 5). The Positive Psychology of Meaning in Life and Well-Being. Retrieved from http://www.drpaulwong.com/ the-positive-psychology-of-meaning-in-life-and-well-being/

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